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What winter? Earth just had its second-warmest December-February on record

Second warmest winter on record

All the weird warmth messed with the region’s flora and fauna, as Gizmodo noted. Flowers started to bloom early in the winter, and some bears even awoke from hibernation at the Bolsherechensky Zoo, the Washington Post said.

In Europe, France had its warmest winter on record, while both Austria and the Netherlands had their second-warmest winter. Austria has a long history of keeping weather data: temperature records there go back to 1767, when Mozart was 11 years old.

What winter? Earth just had its second-warmest December-February on record

Doyle Rice
USA TODAY
Climate change: warm wintersWhat winter?

The months of December, January and February – which meteorologists define as winter here in the Northern Hemisphere – were the second-warmest on record, federal scientists announced Friday.

Only the El Niño-fueled winter of 2015-16 was warmer, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. El Niño, a natural warming of sea water in the tropical Pacific Ocean, acts to boost global temperatures.

Global temperature records for the Earth go back to 1880.

Some of the most extreme warmth was in Russia, which smashed its record for warmest winter. Temperatures there were as much as a whopping 12 degrees above average, according to the country's weather service.

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About 40 million people get water from the Colorado River. Studies show it's drying up.

Colorado River drying upScientists have documented how climate change is sapping the Colorado River, and new research shows the river is so sensitive to warming that it could lose about one-fourth of its flow by 2050 as temperatures continue to climb.

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey found that the loss of snowpack due to higher temperatures plays a major role in driving the trend of the river’s dwindling flow. They estimated that warmer temperatures were behind about half of the 16% decline in the river’s flow during the stretch of drought years from 2000-2017, a drop that has forced Western states to adopt plans to boost the Colorado’s water-starved reservoirs.

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US blocking mention of climate change in G20 statement, diplomats say

g20 communique not allowed to mention climate changeG20  diplomats say the US is against mentioning climate change in the communique of the world’s financial leaders.

A new draft of the joint statement shows the G20 considering including it as a risk factor to growth.

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, this weekend." data-reactid="27">Finance ministers and central bankers from the world’s 20 largest economies are discussing the main challenges to the global economy in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, this weekend.

G20 sources told Reuters that the US was reluctant to accept language on climate change as a risk to the economy.

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Miami Will Be Underwater Soon. Its Drinking Water Could Go First

Miami will be underwater soon; their drinking water may go firstOne morning in June 2018, Douglas Yoder climbed into a white government SUV on the edge of Miami and headed northwest, away from the glittering coastline and into the maze of water infrastructure that makes this city possible.

He drove past drainage canals that sever backyards and industrial lots, ancient water-treatment plants peeking out from behind run-down bungalows, and immense rectangular pools tracing the outlines of limestone quarries. Finally, he reached a locked gate at the edge of the Everglades. Once through, he pointed out the row of 15 wells that make up the Northwest Wellfield, Miami-Dade County’s clean water source of last resort.

Yoder, 71, is deputy director of the county’s water and sewer department; his job is to think about how to defend the county’s fresh drinking water against the effects of climate change. A large man with an ambling gait, Yoder exudes the calm of somebody who’s lived with bad news for a long time.

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Jeff Bezos Pledges $10 Billion To Fight Climate Change: ‘We Can Save Earth’

Jeff Bezos pledges $10B to fight climate changeAmazon’s chief executive, Jeff Bezos, is pledging $10 billion to help fight climate change.

On Monday, the richest man in the world announced on Instagram that he would be launching “the Bezos Earth Fund.”

“Climate change is the biggest threat to our planet. I want to work alongside others both to amplify known ways and to explore new ways of fighting the devastating impact of climate change on this planet we all share,” Bezos wrote in the caption.

“This global initiative will fund scientists, activists, NGOs — any effort that offers a real possibility to help preserve and protect the natural world,” he continued. “We can save Earth. It’s going to take collective action from big companies, small companies, nation states, global organizations, and individuals. ”

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The EPA is about to change a rule cutting mercury pollution. The industry doesn’t want it.

Trump about to cut rules about mercury pollution

For more than three years, the Trump administration has prided itself on working with industry to unshackle companies from burdensome environmental regulations. But as the Environmental Protection Agency prepares to finalize the latest in a long line of rollbacks, the nation’s power sector has sent a different message:

Thanks, but no thanks.

Exelon, one of the nation’s largest utilities, told the EPA that its effort to change a rule that has cut emissions of mercury and other toxins is “an action that is entirely unnecessary, unreasonable, and universally opposed by the power generation sector.”

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Pearl River's third-highest crest on record causes flooding in Jackson, Mississippi

Pearl River's third highest crest on record causes floodingThe Pearl River in Jackson, Mississippi, reached its third-highest crest on record as flooding impacted hundreds of homes and businesses.
The river is currently cresting at 36.7 feet and will go down from that peak soon, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves said Monday.
"After days of rising flood waters we do have positive news to report," Reeves said.
Reeves says that localized flooding continues near the Highway 80 area. The river isn't expected to drop below major flood stage until sometime Wednesday.

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