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Democratic memo: Here are 6 key points in Schiff's rebuttal

Democratic memo released

A redacted version of the Democratic response to a memo alleging that the FBI and Justice Department abused their power to conduct surveillance of former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page was released Saturday.

The 10-page document compiled by Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., pushes back on a number of claims Republicans made in a memo that was released earlier this month, throwing details of the FBI's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election into an almost he-said-she-said story.

The memo's release was initially blocked by President Trump but was made public after a number of redactions. Here are some key takeaways:

1. FBI didn't rely solely on dossier

Democrats say the FBI did not rely on the controversial dossier written by former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele, which was in part funded by Democrats, when they started investigating Page.

The FBI was already investigating Page, who had been assessed to be an "agent of the Russian government," prior to the FBI receiving the dossier.

The timeline in the Democratic memo says the FBI decided to start its investigation into Carter in late July 2016. It received Steele's dossier in mid-September, more than six weeks later.



Attorneys general expand lawsuit against Trump, going after him as a private citizen

Trump to be probed as a private citizenA lawsuit by the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia accusing President Trump of accepting gifts from foreign governments will now challenge Trump as both a government official and a private businessman, The Associated Press reports.

Plaintiffs argue that the president is in violation of the Constitution's "emoluments" clause, which prohibits the president from accepting gifts from foreign governments, because he has failed to divest himself from his lucrative businesses.


'This is not normal': Glitches mar new tax law

Not normal: tax glitches popping up all over

The glitches in the new tax law are starting to pile up.

One inadvertently denies restaurants, retailers and others generous new write-offs for things like remodeling.

Another would allow wealthy money managers to sidestep a crackdown on lucrative tax break that allows them pay lower taxes on some of their income than ordinary wage earners. A third creates two different start dates for new rules that make it harder for businesses to shave their tax bills.

There are dozens of other snafus, hitting everything from real estate investments to multinational corporations to farmers.



Report: Jared Kushner's White House security clearance hits new snag

Jared Kushner's security clearance hits new snagAlthough White House chief of staff John Kelly will make the final call on a security clearance for senior adviser Jared Kushner, a top Justice Department official reportedly alerted the  Trump administration about significant information on the president's son-in-law requiring additional investigation that would further delay the process.

The Washington Post, quoting three unidentified sources, reported Saturday that Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein informed White House counsel Donald McGahn on Feb. 9 about the new developments in the case.


United Airlines, Delta are latest big names to cut ties with NRA

Airlines cut ties with NRA

Two major airlines — United Airlines and Delta — said Saturday that they are notifying the National Rifle Association that they will no longer offer discounted rates for NRA members in the latest display of corporate backlash to the pro-gun organization.

United said it is canceling its program for discounted rates to the NRA's annual meeting while Delta said it was dropping its contract for lower rates through our group travel program.


Bob Alexander: AUTOPSY

Ronald Reagan in The KillersOne of my favorite movies is director Don Siegel’s 1964 remake of The Killers. It was supposed to be one of the first “Made for TV” movies but someone at Universal thought it was too violent so it was released theatrically.

Siegel directed two movies, The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), and Dirty Harry (1971), that are on my List of The 100 Best Movies Ever Made. And then there’s ... The Killers. As a friend of mine said, “Don Siegel was one of those directors who could make good pieces of a movie, but had a hard time making a complete movie." And The Killers is a very good example of that. It’s almost good. Too bad, because the cast is incredible: Lee Marvin, John Cassavetes, Angie Dickinson, Clu Gulager, and … in the last theatrical role of his 27-year long career … and the first time he ever played a bad guy … Ronald Reagan.


Actress Nanette Fabray, Perennial TV Mom, Dies At Age 97

Nanette Fabrau dies at 97

Actress Nanette Fabray, who was known to modern audiences as the mother of Bonnie Franklin’s character on the CBS sitcom “One Day at a Time,” died Thursday at her home in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. She was 97.

The actress, born Ruby Nanette Bernadette Theresa Fabares in San Diego, was performing in vaudeville by the age of 4, according to The New York Times.

By the age of 19, she was doing bit parts in Hollywood movies and made her Broadway debut in the 1941 musical comedy “Let’s Face It” opposite Danny Kaye.


Trump-Russia: Manafort 'paid European ex-politicians'

Manafort paid European ex politicians

Ex-Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort secretly paid unnamed former senior European politicians to lobby for Ukraine's previous pro-Russia government, a new indictment filed by special counsel Robert Mueller says.

Mr Manafort paid over €2m ($2.5m; £1.8m) to the ex-politicians, it says.

He has maintained his innocence in the face of Mr Mueller's investigations.

Mr Trump's ex-deputy campaign manager, Rick Gates, has admitted conspiracy and lying to investigators in a plea deal.


Deaths mounts in Syria as UN weighs cease-fire resolution

Deaths mount in Syria as UN gets set to vote on cease fireSyrian government warplanes carried out a sixth day of airstrikes Friday in the rebel-held suburbs east of Damascus, killing 32 people, activists said, as the death toll from a week of bombardment soared over 400.

At the United Nations, last-minute negotiations were underway ahead of an expected vote on a Security Council resolution demanding a 30-day humanitarian cease-fire.

The new bombings came a day after Syrian army helicopters dropped leaflets over the rebel-controlled areas of eastern Ghouta, urging residents of those suburbs to leave for their own safety and calling on opposition fighters to surrender because they were surrounded by government troops.


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