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Tuesday, Jul 25th

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Supreme Court upholds same-sex parents' birth certificate rights

Supreme Court rules for birth certificate righ to show same sex parentsThe Supreme Court on Monday struck down an Arkansas law that treated same-sex couples differently than opposite-sex couples on their children's birth certificates, over the dissent of three conservative justices.

The ruling came from the court without one justice's authorship. But Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch dissented.

The practice is rare following the high court's 2015 decision striking down state bans on same-sex marriage, but some states put the husbands of new mothers on birth certificates even if they are not the biological fathers, while making no provision for same-sex spouses.

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Supreme Court will hear religious liberty challenge to gay weddings

wedding cake court case to be heard by SCOTUSThe Supreme Court agreed Monday to reopen the national debate over same-sex marriage.

The court will hear a challenge from a Colorado baker who had lost lower court battles over his refusal to create a wedding cake for a gay couple. Like a New Mexico photographer three years ago, the baker cited his religious beliefs.

The justices -- who upheld same-sex marriage nationwide in a landmark 2015 ruling -- apparently decided that despite state laws barring discrimination based on sexual orientation, the merchants' obligation to same-sex couples was not necessarily baked in the cake.

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Supreme Court To Take On Trump’s Travel Ban

Justices of the supreme courtThe Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case on President Donald Trump’s ban on visitors from six Muslim-majority countries. The case will be argued in October.

Within two weeks of taking office, Trump issued an executive order restricting visits from seven Muslim-majority countries for three months and suspending America’s refugee resettlement program, arguing that federal officials needed to review the vetting process in the interest of national security.

The order fulfilled one of the new president’s most controversial campaign promises. But the chaotic weekend that ensued ― dozens of people detained at airports and protests nationwide ― also played an early role in defining the Trump administration as clumsy and disinterested in the details and process of policymaking.

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Dakota Access review to re-examine impact on tribe

Impact on Dakota tribe by pipeline to be reviewedA federal judge has ordered another review of whether the already-operating Dakota Access pipeline might unfairly affect the Standing Rock Sioux.

It's uncertain how the process will unfold, but there are two main possibilities. Federal officials who permitted the project to move North Dakota oil to Illinois could revise their analysis, or they could conduct a full environmental study.

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Citing LGBT discrimination, California bans state travel to Kentucky and three other states

California bans state funded travel to 4 statesCalifornia's attorney general blocked state-funded travel to Kentucky and three other states on Thursday in response to what he considers anti-LGBT rights laws enacted this year.

Chris Hartman, the director of Louisville's Fairness Campaign, said that the bill the California AG is retaliating against, Senate Bill 17, could have indirect repercussions on the LGBT community in one of the nation's more gay-friendly cities.

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Judge rules Iraqi Christians detained by ICE can stay in U.S. for at least 2 more weeks

Deportation of Iraqi Christians delayed A federal judge ruled Thursday that the 114 Iraqi immigrants facing deportation can stay in the U.S. for at least two more weeks as he sorts out whether the court has jurisdiction. Supporters say the immigrants would face persecution in Iraq since many of them are Christians.

The judge's decision was cheered by the ACLU of Michigan and attorneys for the Iraqi immigrants.

U.S. District Judge Mark Goldsmith said in a written opinion released Thursday: "The stay shall expire 14 days from today, unless otherwise ordered by the Court."

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Supreme Court limits government's power to revoke citizenship

SCOTUS limits gov't ability to revoke citizenshipThe Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a naturalized immigrant can’t be stripped of their citizenship for making false statements during the naturalization process that are irrelevant to an immigration official's decision to grant or deny citizenship.

A unanimous court said the government must establish that an immigrant’s illegal act during the naturalization process played some role in acquiring citizenship. When the underlying illegal act is a false statement, the justices said a jury must decide whether the false statements altered the naturalization process and influenced the immigration official's decision.

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