TV News LIES

Monday, Aug 21st

Last update05:20:13 AM GMT

You are here News War Toppling Saddam's statue: How the media inflated a minor moment in the Iraq war

Toppling Saddam's statue: How the media inflated a minor moment in the Iraq war

E-mail Print PDF

Toppling the statue of Saddam HusseinAfter the marines arrived, a small group of Iraqis gathered around a statue of Saddam Hussein in the middle of the square and tried to bring it down with a sledgehammer and rope. More photographers and TV crews appeared. An American flag was draped over the statue’s head. Eventually, a Marine vehicle equipped with a crane toppled the statue. The spectacle was broadcast live around the world.

Some have argued that the events at Firdos were staged, to demonstrate that America had triumphed, the war was over, and the Iraqis were happy. After all, the marines had seized the only place in Baghdad where a large number of foreign reporters could be found—at least two hundred were at the Palestine.

And U.S. officials were suspiciously quick to appropriate the imagery from Firdos. A few minutes after the toppling, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld told reporters, “The scenes of free Iraqis celebrating in the streets, riding American tanks, tearing down the statues of Saddam Hussein in the center of Baghdad are breathtaking. Watching them, one cannot help but think of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Iron Curtain.”

Propaganda has been a staple of warfare for ages, but the notion of creating events on the battlefield, as opposed to repackaging real ones after the fact, is a modern development. It expresses a media theory developed by, among others, Walter Lippmann, who after the First World War identified the components of wartime mythmaking as “the casual fact, the creative imagination, the will to believe, and out of these three elements, a counterfeit of reality.”

As he put it, “Men respond as powerfully to fictions as they do to realities [and] in many cases they help to create the very fictions to which they respond.” In the nineteen-sixties, Daniel J. Boorstin identified a new category of media spectacle that he called “pseudo-events,” which were created to be reported on. But Boorstin was theorizing primarily about political conventions and press conferences, not about events on a battlefield.

More...


Most Recent Related Stories...


U.S. court tosses murder conviction of ex-Blackwater guard

Nicholas Slatten conviction overturnedA federal appeals court on Friday threw out the murder conviction of an ex-Blackwater security guard...

US-trained Iraqi army unit 'linked to Mosul war crimes'

Mosul war crimesA US-trained Iraqi army division allegedly executed dozens of men in the final phase of the...

Insult to injury: how Trump's 'global gag' will hit women traumatized by war

Women victims of war endangered by Gag RuleIf the first victim of war is the truth, the second is often female. And the...

At least 15 Afghan police officers killed in friendly fire airstrike

At leat 15 Afghan police dead in friendly fire air attackMore than a dozen Afghanistan police officers were killed during an airstrike in the Helmand province...
 
America's # 1 Enemy
Tee Shirt
& Help Support TvNewsLIES.org!
TVNL Tee Shirt
 
TVNL TOTE BAG
Conserve our Planet
& Help Support TvNewsLIES.org!
 
Get your 9/11 & Media
Deception Dollars
& Help Support TvNewsLIES.org!
 
The Loaded Deck
The First & the Best!
The Media & Bush Admin Exposed!